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Best Deshedding Brushes For Your Dog

When having your pet on the sofa or the bed becomes more of a cleaning task than a pleasure, you know it's time to do something about the shedding. Not to mention in the car! There's a lot of choices out there, and you can spend a lot of time and money buying the wrong brush. That's if you happen to get the right one the second time.


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Deshedding Demystified


There's quite a few types and depending upon your pets coat, and you may need to get a couple different styles to accommodate a mixed coat type. I'm going to show you what kind to get for each of these coat types:

  • Smooth

  • Short

  • Double coat (coarse outer layer with a downy undercoat)

  • Mixed coat (Short & long areas)


Here's an old snapshot of what I used in the salon years ago. I've since then updated my selection, but each type is included:


As you can see there's a LOT of different brush styles.

Brushes

  • Slicker s/m/l

  • Pin

  • Bristle/pin

Combs

  • With handle

  • Without handle

  • Flea

Rakes

  • Coarse

  • Fine

Detangling

  • Matt splitter

  • Dethatching tool

Deshedding

  • Rubber curry (this is the only tool that kids should use)

  • Dethatching too

  • Metal shedding blade

Grooming tools have come a long way in the last 10 years and you need to know which ones to get for your specific coat type.



Smooth coat


This coat needs only a rubber curry. The nubs are pretty sturdy so you may you may need a finer curry to get some of the spots that don't have much muscle padding like the legs, ears and face.


Because you can apply a good amount of pressure without fear of abrading the skin it's also a good choice for kids to use.




Short coat


metal bladed shedding tool can be used in the areas of short not smooth areas.

rubber curry for smooth coated areas



Double coat (coarse outer layer with a downy undercoat)

We'll move from coarse to finer tools for this.


This definitely needs a couple different brushes.



Slicker brush to remove the bulky, thick or dense coat.

Metal tool to dethatch. (It's very safe so don't be afraid of the name stripping comb)


If your pet is still shedding you can follow up with the instructions for short coats


Mixed coat (Short & long areas)

We'll move from coarse to finer tools for this also.


The long areas will need a slicker brush to remove any tangles or hair that is mixed up in a way that won't allow the rest of the shedding to slide out. Follow up with a comb or if you have a large pet use a rake style tool. The rake is much easier on your wrist minimizing fatigue and thus making your time and efforts more effective.


Slicker brush to remove the bulky, thick or dense coat.

Metal tool to dethatch. (It's very safe so don't be afraid of the name stripping comb)


For the short areas a rubber curry could be useful.



Let me know if these tools are working for you or if you have any challenges and I can help you navigate through those.


Regards, Jennifer






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